Fac-simile editions & manuscript digitization project launched in Guarneriana, Italy

guarnerianaOne of the oldest and most beautiful surviving copies of Dante’s “Inferno” is preserved in Italy in San Daniele del Friuli, near Udine. It is part of the astonishing collection of over 12,000 manuscripts  owned by the Biblioteca Guarneriana, one of Europe’s most ancient public libraries, founded in 1466 by scholar ad humanist  Guarnerio d’Artegna.

The manuscript – catalogued  as “ms. Fontaniano 200” – was copied in the XIVth century. It is fully illustrated  with high quality miniatures, and containes two commentaries of Dante Alighieri’s masterpiece: one, written in Latin,  by Graziolo de’ Bambaglioli, the other composed in Italian “volgare” between 1324 and 1334 by an anonymous but very intriguing author.

Guarneriana’s Codex 200 has been studied by several scholars and is now available in a very accurate fac-simile edition by Italian publisher Roberto Vattori which will be presented,  together with two important fac-simile editions of Longobard manuscripts  by  Capsa Ars Scriptoria (Codice Cividalese XXVIII, Paolus Diaconus’s “Historia Langobardorum”, and Codex Cavensis 4, “Leges Langobardorum), during the  “MEDIOEVALIA: Medioevo e Medioevi in Guarneriana”  Conference on October 22, 2016.

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Guarneriana has also launched the brand new manuscript digitization project “TECA DIGITALE”, which gives full online access to 13 of the most important codices  which are part of the collection: among them, Ms. Fontaniniano 200, Peter Lombard’s Liber Sententiarum (ms 42 ), the “Bizantine Bible” (ms 3), Augustin’s De Civitate Dei (ms 8), Brunetto Latini’s Tresor (ms 238), Cicero’s Orationes (ms 59), and works by Seneca (ms 7).

Info: www.guarneriana.it, info@guarneriana.it

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News: Medieval Dublin XV

FMRSI

Medieval Dublin XV
Seán Duffy, editor

This volume contains reports on a number of important archaeological excavations in the Dublin area in recent years, including: Claire Walsh’s discovery of a medieval property plot at Back Lane, which contained the remains of Hiberno-Norse and Anglo-Norman houses; Paul Duffy’s excavations at Baldoyle that produced evidence of metalworking, cereal processing, animal husbandry and coastal foraging from the Viking Age onwards; and Edmond O’Donovan’s discovery of a large early Christian cemetery at Mount Gamble in Swords. To accompany his detailed report on the latter the volume includes an important study of the ecclesiastical and political history of the Swords area written by the late Ailbhe MacShamhráin. Also of note: Matthew Stout reconsiders the evidence for Dublin’s situation vis-à-vis the road network of ancient Ireland; Pat Wallace discusses the role of women in Viking-Age Dublin; Daniel Brown has a fascinating account of what happened in…

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